Life During Wartime: Raw vs Nitro 1996 (Week 3)

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Now with added match results and crap, so you don’t have to wade through 17 pages of worthless analysis and opinions.

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Thunderlists: 5 Stables WWE Hasn’t Whored Out Yet (And How They Could Work)

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If there’s ever been a more poorly executed concept in wrestling history, it’s pretty much anything associated with Vince Russo. Otherwise though, it’s the stable. Ever since the time of the original Four Horsemen (Ric Flair, Tully Blanchard and Arn & Ole Arnderson) way back in the territory days every fed has wanted their own version of the wrasslin’ Justice League or, more commonly, Legion of Doom. It’s hard not to see why, given how much of the wrestling business is based around merchandising; if you strike gold with a good concept, that’s more T-shirts, action figures, DVD’s and (most importantly) tickets you can sell. With a stable it’s even better, because ideally you’re selling the stable as well as the individual members of that group, meaning even more money on top of that. WWE, WCW, TNA, ECW, even promotions in Japan have gotten in on it over the years, with varying levels of success.

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Atomic Drops: THE WRESTLING CLASSIC: That Ain’t No Good Draw

Originally posted on Atomic Anxiety:

The Wrestling Classic

The Wrestling Classic (WWF) – November 7, 1985 – Rosemont Horizon (Rosemont, IL) – Main Event: Hulk Hogan (c) vs Rowdy Roddy Piper (WWF Championship) – Announcers: Gorilla Monsoon, Jesse “The Body” Ventura, Vince McMahon, Lord Alfred Hayes, and “Mean” Gene Okerlund.

I really don’t like one-event wrestling tournaments like KING OF THE RING, and THE WRESTLING CLASSIC is almost entirely taken up by a large tournament featuring 16 wrestlers. The problem with these tournaments is that either the matches are long, and the wrestlers get burnt out, or they’re short and the fans might not be properly entertained. The more matches you have, the more downtime there is between matches.

That said, THE WRESTLING CLASSIC is surprisingly enjoyable. Things move fast and there’s a wide variety of matches (short, technical, brawls), and the sheer old schoolness of much of the event (the Rosemont Horizon looks, feels, and sounds like…

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The Slobberknocker Chronicles – Issue #4: No Time For Entrances

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In episode 4, Thomas and I review WrestleMania 29. Or is it NY/NJ? Also, I profess my love of Ryback, Thomas gives the Big Show all the props he never gets, we preview Extreme Rules, Thomas makes a case for The Undertaker to headline WrestleMania for the rest of his career, discuss The Rock’s injury, Paul Bearer’s passing, our mutual hate of the WWE app, Thomas vents his frustration with the tag team division, and I explain how Road Dogg is a black man trapped in a white man’s body. Ring the bell or feed us more!

The Slobberknocker Chronicles – Issue #4: No Time For Entrances

Atomic Drops: WRESTLEMANIA XII: The Giants Are Squaring Off

Originally posted on Atomic Anxiety:

WrestleMania 12

WrestleMania XII (March 31, 1996) – Arrowhead Pond (Anaheim, CA) – Main Event: Shawn Michaels vs. Bret Hart (Iron Man Match for WWF Championship) – Announcers: Vince McMahon, Jerry “the King” Lawler, Mr. Perfect, Todd Pettengill, and Dok Hendrix (aka Michael Hayes).

After the celebrity indulgence of WRESTLEMANIA XI, WRESTLEMANIA XII puts the big spotlight back on the wrestlers, featuring a 60-minute Iron Man Match between Bret Hart and Shawn Michaels for the WWF Championship. It’s a smart move – if you really want people to keep coming back for the product, you have to hook them on the product instead of the accoutrements, and there’s no better way to figure out if someone is a wrestling fan than sitting them down and having them watch the Heartbreak Kid and the Hitman wrestle in their prime.

I kinda love WRESTLEMANIA XII – it’s far from the best WrestleMania of all…

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